The Four Purusharthas: Moksha

The Fourth Aim: Moksha Our investigation of the four Purusharthas, or aims of life in the Vedic tradition, concludes with Moksha, which means release, liberation or self-realization. The harmonious interactions of the first three aims, Dharma, Artha and Kama, are the...

The Four Purusharthas: Artha

The Second Aim: Artha The second Purushartha or aim of human existence as described in the Vedic texts is Artha, which means “wealth”, “means” or “goal” in Sanskrit. Artha is kept in check by Dharma. The Purursharthas are not to be...

The Four Purusharthas: Dharma

The First Aim: Dharma The regulating moral principles of the Universe are described in the ancient Vedic texts to be the four Purusharthas, ususally translated as “aims of human existence”. Specifically, they are defined as Dharma (duty), Artha (wealth),...

SANKALPA and the Power of Mars

By Gwen Burdick In Yogic philosophy, when the intention of the heart and intention of the mind merge with resolve and determination in search of Truth, we have what is called Sankalpa in Sanskrit, or solemn vow.   “Kalpa” means vow and “san” means truth.  It refers to...

Exploring The Yoga Sutras: 2.29

Yoga sutra 2.29 states, Yama niyamasana pranayama pratyahara dharana dhyana samadhi astau angani: The eight limbs of yoga are: yama (self-regulation), niyama (observances), asana (posture), pranayama (breath control), pratyahara (withdrawal of senses), dharana...

Sadhana – Part 2: By Gwen Burdick

Once we find relative ease in the physical body, we can turn our attention to the mind and the necessary practice of meditation. Vedic teaching tells us that the mind is the cause of both bondage and liberation. An undisciplined mind runs incessantly from one object...